BATMAN-THE DARK KNIGHT(2008)-DOWNLOAD

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Yahoo Messenger trick-How to open Multiple Yahoo Messenger???

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Yahoo Messenger trick-How to open Multiple Yahoo Messenger???


1. Go to start > Run > Type regedit > Press Enter

2. Click on the plus sign near the folder HKEY_CURRENT_USER

3. Click on the plus sign near the folder Software

4. Click on the plus sign near the folder Yahoo

5. Click on the plus sign near the folder Pager

6. Right Click on the folder name Test > New > DWORD Value

7. Right side you will get a file named New Value #1

8. Right Click on the file New Value #1 and Rename it as Plural and press enter

9. Double Click on the file Plural

10. You will get a windown named Edit DWORD Value

11. Type 1 inside 'Select the Value data' and press enter

12. Close the registery editor window

13. Now you can launch multiple windows and use different ID's.
4:01 PM

change mac address

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Method 1:

This is depending on the type of Network Interface Card (NIC) you have. If you have a card that doesn’t support Clone MAC address, then you have to go to second method.

1.

Go to Start->Settings->Control Panel and double click on Network and Dial-up Connections.
2.

Right click on the NIC you want to change the MAC address and click on properties.
3.

Under “General” tab, click on the “Configure” button
4.

Click on “Advanced” tab
5.

Under “Property section”, you should see an item called “Network Address” or "Locally Administered Address", click on it.
6.

On the right side, under “Value”, type in the New MAC address you want to assign to your NIC. Usually this value is entered without the “-“ between the MAC address numbers.
7.

Goto command prompt and type in “ipconfig /all” or “net config rdr” to verify the changes. If the changes are not materialized, then use the second method.
8.

If successful, reboot your systems.



Method 2:

This method requires some knowledge on the Windows Registry. If you are not familiar with Windows Registry, just use the SMAC tool to change the MAC addresses, or consult with a technical person before you attempt on the following steps. Also, make sure you have a good backup of your registry.

a. Goto command prompt and type “ipconfig /all”, and

I. Record the Description for the NIC you want to change.

II. Record the Physical Address for the NIC you want to change. Physical Address is the MAC Address
[IMG]http://i271.photobucket.com/albums/jj160/tukyunaaya/ipconfig.gif[/IMG]
figure 1.

b. Goto command prompt and type “net config rdr”, and you should see something like

http://i271.photobucket.com/albums/jj160/tukyunaaya/net_config_rdr.gif
figure 2.

c. Remember the number between the long number (GUID) inside the { }. For example, in the above “net config rdr” output, for MAC address “00C095ECB793,” you should remember {1C9324AD-ADB7-4920-B02D-AB281838637A}. You can copy and paste it to the Notepad, that’s probably the easiest way. (See figure 2.)

d. Go to Start -> Run, type “regedt32” to start registry editor. Do not use “Regedit.”

e. Do a BACKUP of your registry in case you screw up the following steps. To do this

I. Click on “HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE on Local Machine” sub-window

II. Click on the root key “HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE”.

III. Click on the drop-down menu “Registry -> Save Subtree As” and save the backup registry in to a file. Keep this file in a safe place.

f. Go to “HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Control\Class\{4D36E972-E325-11CE-BFC1-08002BE10318}. Double click on it to expand the tree. The subkeys are 4-digit numbers, which represent particular network adapters. You should see it starts with 0000, then 0001, 0002, 0003 and so on. (See figure 3.)

http://i271.photobucket.com/albums/jj160/tukyunaaya/mac_reg.gif
Figure 3.

g. Go through each subkey that starts with 0000. Click on 0000, check DriverDesc keyword on the right to see if that's the NIC you want to change the MAC address. The DriveDesc should match the Description you recorded from step (a.-I.). If you are not 100% sure about the DriverDesc, then you can verify by checking if the NetCfgInstanceID keyword value matches the GUID from step (c).
If there is no match, then move on to 0001, 0002, 0003, and so on, until you find the one you want. Usually 0000 contains the first NIC you installed on the computer.
In this demonstration, 0000 is the NIC I selected. (See figure 3.)

h. Once you selected the subkey (i.e. 0000), check if there is a keyword "NetworkAddress" exist in the right side of the window. (See figure 3.)

I. If "NetworkAddress" keyword does not exist, then create this new keyword:

i. Click on the drop down menu “Edit -> Add Value”.

ii. In the Add Value window, enter the following value then click OK. (See figure 4.)
Value Name: = NetworkAddress
Data Type: = REG_SZ

http://i271.photobucket.com/albums/jj160/tukyunaaya/mac_new_value.gif
Figure 4.

iii. String Editor window will pop up at this time (see figure 5.)

iv. Enter the new MAC address you want to modify. Then click OK.
(There should not be any "-" in this address. Your entry should only consist of 12 digits as seen in the figure 5.)

II. If "NetworkAddress" keyword exists, make sure it shows the keyword type is REG_SZ, and it should show as NetworkAddress:REG_SZ: . This keyword might not have a value at this time.

i. Double click on the keyword NetworkAddress and the String Editor window will pop up. (See Figure 5.)

ii. Enter the new MAC address you want to modify. Then click OK.
(There should not be any "-" in this address. Your entry should only consist of 12 digits as seen in the figure 5.)
http://i271.photobucket.com/albums/jj160/tukyunaaya/mac_new_string.gif
Figure 5.

j. There are 2 ways to make the new MAC address active. Method I does not require a system reboot:

I. Goto Start->Setting->Control Panel, and double click on "Network Neighborhood".
WARNING: Make sure you understand that you WILL lose the network connection after completing step "ii." below, and
if you have a DHCP client, you will get a new IP address after completing step "iii."

i. Select the Network Adaptor you just changed the MAC address.

ii. Right click on the selected Network Adaptor and click "Disable."
Verify the status column for this adaptor changes to "Disabled"

iii. Right click on the selected Network Adaptor and click "Enable."
Verify the status column for this adaptor changes to "Enabled"

iv. If for any reason it cannot be disabled or re-enabled, you have to
reboot your system to make the changes effective.

II. Reboot your Windows system.

k. Once completing step j (if rebooting the system, wait until the reboot is completed), go to command prompt, type “ipconfig /all” to confirm the new MAC address.



Restore The TRUE Hardware burned-in MAC Address:

1.

Remove the entry you added:

1.

If you followed Method 1, then go back to the advanced properties window and remove the entry you add.
2.

If you followed Method 2, then remove the "NetworkAddress" keyword you added in the registry.

2.

Use step (j) above to activate the change you make.
3.

Once rebooted, go to command prompt, type “ipconfig /all” to confirm the original MAC address.



If MAC Address changes does not work:

If for whatever reason the MAC address cannot be changed using method 2, make sure you restore the registry setting by following the "Restore The TRUE Hardware burned-in MAC Address" instruction above. If necessary, restore the registry you just backed-up to get your system back to the original state. You can do this by clicking on the drop-down menu “Registry->Restore,” and restore your backup registry file.

or use SMAC
5:01 PM

Not A Tweak, But A Double XP Surprise!

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Neither Win2K nor WinME has the ability to create a simple, basic, DOS- based boot floppy (a "startup disk") unless you jump through hoops or do things in nonstandard ways. Because XP is the fusion of Win2K and Win9x/ME, I assumed it would follow the same "no boot floppy" tack. But instead, I was surprised to poke around in XP and see that the format option there does indeed offer a "Create MS-DOS Startup Disk."
As an experiment, I created a startup disk, and all went smoothly. I was able to use the disk to boot my PC without any problems. But when it started up, I got the second surprise. The DOS boot message showed "Microsoft Windows Millennium." To confirm this, I typed "Ver" to see what version of DOS was running, and the screen showed: Windows Millennium [Version 4.90.300]
Although it's very strange to see the WinME startup message on an XP-created floppy, all this means is that Microsoft cribbed a few essential DOS boot files from WinME, and made it so XP can drop them onto a freshly- formatted floppy for you. I'm glad they did: It's a very good thing that Microsoft restored the ability to make a simple boot disk.
6:08 PM

Fast Boot /Fast Resume Design

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Customer research shows a frequently requested feature that users want from their PCs is fast system startup, whether from cold boot or when resuming from standby or hibernation. The Windows development team at Microsoft has taken bold steps in making fast startup PCs a reality with the Microsoft Windows XP operating system.
The design goals for Windows XP on a typical consumer PC are:

* Boot to a useable state in a total of 30 seconds
* Resume from Hibernate (S4) in a total of 20 seconds
* Resume from Standby (S3) in a total of 5 seconds

Boot and resume times are measured from the time the power switch is pressed to being able to start a program from a desktop shortcut. Click here to go to Microsoft's development center and learn how, download boot tools and read white papers on the subject.
6:08 PM

Stop Password Expiration

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After you have run Windows XP for a while, you may receive this message when you log on: "Your password will expire in 14 days.....".
By default, Windows XP is set up with passwords which will expire after 42 days. 14 days in advance, Windows will start warning you of this fact. If you do not want your passwords to expire:

1. Go to Start > Run and in the Open: box type control userpasswords2
2. Select the Advanced tab in the User Accounts window
3. Press the Advanced button below the Advanced user management header
4. Select Users in the Local Users and Groups
5. In the right pane, right-click the user name for which you want to change the setting, and select Properties
6. On the General tab, check Password never expires
7. Click Apply and OK (all the way out)
6:07 PM

Unlock Toolbars to Customize Them

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Windows XP now features locking toolbars, and you can adjust them. You can customize a lot of the Windows XP features such as the Taskbar, Start Menu, and even toolbar icons in Internet Explorer and Outlook Express. Remember your right-click:

* Right-click on a toolbar, and then click Lock the Toolbars to remove the check mark.
* Right-click on the toolbar again, and then click Customize.
* You can add and remove toolbar buttons, change text options and icon options. When you've got the toolbar customized, click Close.
* Now right-click on the toolbar and then click Lock the Toolbars to lock them in place.
6:07 PM

Add Familiar Icons back to your desktop

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It’s the case of the missing icons. Many of you may be wondering where all the icons from your desktop are in Windows XP? Well if you're like me, you like to have at least My Computer, My Network Places, and My Documents on the desktop.
To do this:

* Right-click on the desktop, and then click Properties.
* Click the Desktop tab and then click on Customize Desktop.
* Put a check mark in the box next to My Document, My Computer, My Network Places, or Internet Explorer, to add those familiar icons to your desktop.
6:07 PM

Use the Windows Classic Look

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More comfortable performing a task with the familiar Windows Classic user interface? You can quickly switch the user interface to the familiar Windows Classic appearance on your computer if it helps you remember a task in your operating system or program. You can go back to the original Windows look with a couple clicks.

* Right-click on your desktop, and then click Properties.
* Click the Appearance tab.
* On the Windows and Buttons menu, select Windows Classic. Click OK.

There you go, now you can feel right at home with the old look, and you'll still get the best out of Windows XP, new look or old.
6:06 PM

Speed up the Start Menu

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You can use this tip to speed up the Start Menu in Windows XP release candidate 1. You can customize the speed of the Start Menu by editing a Registry Key.

1. Click Start, and then click Run.
2. Type Regedit in the box, and then click OK.
3. Expand the menu in the left panel and select the HKEY_CURRENT_USER\Control Panel\Desktop folder.
4. Scroll down in the right panel and double click on the MenuShowDelay file.
5. In the Value Data box, change to default value for the menu speed from 400 to a lesser number, such as 1.
6. Click OK.

Caution: Incorrectly editing the registry may severely damage your system. Before making changes to the registry, you should back up any valued data on your computer.
6:06 PM

Add a Map Drive Button to the Toolbar

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Do you want to quickly map a drive, but can’t find the toolbar button? If you map drives often, use one of these options to add a Map Drive button to the folder toolbar.

1. Option One (Long Term Fix)
* Click Start, click My Computer, right-click the toolbar, then unlock the toolbars, if necessary.
* Right-click the toolbar again, and then click Customize.
* Under Available toolbar buttons, locate Map Drive, and drag it into the position you want on the right under Current toolbar buttons.
* Click Close, click OK, and then click OK again.
You now have drive mapping buttons on your toolbar, so you can map drives from any folder window. To unmap drives, follow the above procedure, selecting Disconnect under Available toolbar buttons. To quickly map a drive, try this option.
2. Option Two (Quick Fix)
* Click Start, and right-click My Computer.
* Click Map Network Drive.

If you place your My Computer icon directly on the desktop, you can make this move in only two clicks!
6:06 PM

Increase your cable modem or DSL speed in XP

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This tweak is for broad band cable connections on stand alone machines with winXP professional version - might work on Home version also. It will probably work with networked machines as well but I haven't tried it in that configuration. This is for windows XP only, it does not work on win2000.
I use 3 Com cards so I don't know how it works on others at this point. It does not involve editing the registry. This tweak assumes that you have let winXP create a connection on install for your cable modem/NIC combination and that your connection has tcp/ip - QoS - file and print sharing - and client for microsoft networks , only, installed. It also assumes that winxp will detect your NIC and has in-box drivers for it. If it doesn't do not try this.
In the "My Network Places" properties (right click on the desktop icon and choose properties), highlight the connection then at the menu bar choose "Advanced" then "Advanced Settings". Uncheck the two boxes in the lower half for the bindings for File and Printer sharing and Client for MS networks. Click OK

1. From the windows XP cd in the support directory from the support cab, extract the file netcap.exe and place it in a directory on your hard drive or even in the root of your C:\ drive.
2. next, open up a command prompt window and change directories to where you put netcap.exe. then type "netcap/?". It will list some commands that are available for netcap and a netmon driver will be installed. At the bottom you will see your adapters. You should see two of them if using a 3Com card. One will be for LAN and the other will be for WAN something or other.
3. Next type "netcap/Remove". This will remove the netmon driver.
4. Open up control panel / system / dev man and look at your network adapters. You should now see two of them and one will have a yellow ! on it. Right click on the one without the yellow ! and choose uninstall. YES! you are uninstalling your network adapter, continue with the uninstall. Do not restart yet.
5. Check your connection properties to make sure that no connection exists. If you get a wizard just cancel out of it.
6. Now re-start the machine.
7. After re-start go to your connection properties again and you should have a new connection called "Local area connection 2". highlight the connection then at the menu bar choose "Advanced" then "Advanced Settings". Uncheck the two boxes in the lower half for the bindings for File and Printer sharing and Client for MS networks. Click OK.
8. Choose connection properties and uncheck the "QOS" box
9. Re-start the machine
10. after restart enjoy the increased responsivness of IE, faster page loading, and a connection speed boost.

Why it works, it seems that windows XP, in its zeal to make sure every base is covered installs two seperate versions of the NIC card. One you do not normally see in any properties. Remember the "netcap/?" command above showing two different adapters? The LAN one is the one you see. The invisible one loads everything down and its like your running two separate cards together, sharing a connection among two cards, this method breaks this "bond" and allows the NIC to run un-hindered.
6:06 PM

Disable error reporting

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* Open Control Panel
* Click on Performance and Maintenance.
* Click on System.
* Then click on the Advanced tab
* Click on the error-reporting button on the bottom of the windows.
* Select Disable error reporting.
* Click OK
* Click OK
6:05 PM

Turn of CD Auto Play

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* Open My Computer
* Right click on your CD ROM and choose Properties
* Click on the Auto Play tab
* In the drop down box you can choose the Action for each choice shown in the drop down box

Or

1. Go to Start->Run->gpedit.msc
2. Computer Config -> Administrative Template -> System
3. Double click Turn off Autoplay
4. Enable it.
6:05 PM

Increase BROADBAND

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This is for broad band connections. I didn’t try it on dial up but might work for dial up.

1. make sure your logged on as actually "Administrator". do not log on with any account that just has administrator privileges.
2. start - run - type gpedit.msc
3. expand the "local computer policy" branch
4. expand the "administrative templates" branch
5. expand the "network branch"
6. Highlight the "QoS Packet Scheduler" in left window
7. in right window double click the "limit reservable bandwidth" setting
8. on setting tab check the "enabled" item
9. where it says "Bandwidth limit %" change it to read 0

Effect is immediate on some systems, some need to re-boot. This is more of a "counter what XP does" thing. In other words, programs can request up to 20% of the bandwidth be reserved for them, even with QoS disabled, this is no big deal and most programs do not request it. So, although QOS has caused a big stink because people think it reserves 20% of their bandwidth, you can still disable it, just to be sure, hehe.
6:05 PM

Internet Connection Sharing

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To enable Internet Connection Sharing on a network connection:

1. Open Network Connections.
2. Click the dial-up, local area network, PPPoE, or VPN connection you want to share, and then, under Network Tasks, click Change settings of this connection.
3. On the Advanced tab, select the Allow other network users to connect through this computer's Internet connection check box.
4. If you want this connection to dial automatically when another computer on your home or small office network attempts to access external resources, select the Establish a dial-up connection whenever a computer on my network attempts to access the Internet check box.
5. If you want other network users to enable or disable the shared Internet connection, select the Allow other network users to control or disable the shared Internet connection check box.
6. Under Internet Connection Sharing, in Home networking connection, select any adapter that connects the computer sharing its Internet connection to the other computers on your network.
6:04 PM

Watch your cookies

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In XP, the Documents And Settings folder holds all user information, including configuration settings, favorites, and cookies. The Documents And Settings\Username\Cookies folder is where XP stashes cookies. How do you control the number of cookies you allow on your system? Click Start > Control Panel > Network And Internet Connections > Internet Options. Click the Privacy tab, then use the slider bar to modify your cookie settings. For instance, you can block cookies from sites that use personal identification without your consent. To increase your security, try out the other privacy settings in this dialog. The lowest level is Accept All Cookies while the highest is Block All Cookies, with low, medium, medium-high, and high settings in between. (An explanation of each appears as you move between settings.) Keep in mind that rejecting cookies may limit your actions on some Web sites, and some sites use cookies to track how many times you see a popup, for example, on this website, if you blocked cookies, you would see a popup on every page.
6:04 PM

Want to remove MSN Messenger?

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A lot of people want to know how to remove the MSN Messenger service from XP... here's how:
Locate SYSOC.INF in the \Windows\INF folder (hidden file and folder), Open it in Notepad and locate the line: msmsgs=msgrocm.dll,OcEntry,msmsgs.inf,hide,7
Remove the word "hide" from the line and save the file. You will now have an entry in add/remove programs. Do what you will :)
OR (XP Pro Only) leave it installed, but tell Windows to never let it run. If you're running XP Professional, you can use GPEDIT.MSC to prevent Messenger from loading. Otherwise, even disabling it in startup won't cause it to "always" not run. NOTE: Outlook, Outlook Express and some Microsoft web pages can still make it load.
# Start, Run and enter GPEDIT.MSC
# Computer Configuration > Administrative Templates > Windows Components > Windows Messenger
# You can now modify whether it starts initially and/or whether it's to run at all. UPDATE: I have recieved some email that say this fix slows down outlook when starting, that is because outlook wants to start messenger when it starts, the easiest and fastest way to disable messenger and still have a quickj starttime with outlook is to rename the exe file, located here c:\program files\messenger\msmsgs.exe, to something other than msmsgs.exe, such as msmsgsnew.exe.
6:03 PM

How to Install the Netbeui Protocol on a Windows XP-Based Computer

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This article describes how to install the NetBEUI protocol on a Windows XP-based computer. This may be useful because the NetBEUI protocol is not included in the list of installable protocols in Windows XP even though the files that are needed to install the protocol are included with the installation CD-ROM. It is important to note that the NetBEUI protocol is not supported on Windows XP.
The Netnbf.inf and Nbf.sys files are the files that are needed to install the NetBEUI protocol. To install the NetBEUI protocol:

1. Click Start, click Control Panel, and then double-click Network Connections.
2. Right-click the adapter you want to add NetBEUI to, and then click Properties.
3. On the General tab, click Install.
4. Click Protocol, and then click Add.
5. Click Have Disk, insert your Windows XP CD-ROM, open the Valueadd\msft\net\netbeui folder, click the Netnbf.inf file, and then click Open.
6. Click OK, and then click OK to complete the installation.
6:01 PM

Upgrate Windows XP To Windows Vista With Reinstall DVD

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Q: If you have Windows XP can you install Windows Vista using the reinstall DVD sent with someone else’s computer?

A: If this DVD was sent from the factory with someone else’s computer then no you would not be able to use that on a different machine. Windows Vista CDs can only be used on one machine as it rights messages to the computer registry and Vista also frequently contacts the Microsoft website for updates and also to ensure that the program is only installed on the correct machine. When you do the installation also it will query the BIOS and realize that it is not the correct machine. Therefore, I would not recommend you do this.
4:30 PM

Transfering A DOS Program From Windows XP To Vista

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Q: Can I transfer a DOS program from my computer with Windows XP to my laptop with Windows Vista and if so how.?

A: You can definitely transfer a DOS program from Windows XP to Vista system. However, at times transferring various programs from Windows XP operating system to Windows Vista has turned to be a real hassle for some users. You can minimize this complexity by following few simple steps.

To meet the migration requirements Vista is already equipped with “Migration tools”. These tools give you three options for migrating your programs. These are:

* Network connections
* Transferable media
* Migration through CD or DVD

Moreover migration tools are also available in two modes namely; Windows Easy Transfer performs transfer from one computer to another and User State Migration Tool (USMT), facilitates transference from single user to multiple users. Now let us explore the modus operandi of transferring any DOS program from XP to Vista version of Windows applying easy transfer method.

Migrations Applying Windows Easy Transfer - Migration of DOS programs from Windows XP to Vista through WET is done impeccably. First of all WET should be installed to both the computers although most of the Vista installed computers are already equipped with WET. Then connect these two systems through WET cable or by creating the required network connections. After the necessary connections, run the WET program on both the systems. This program will impart the essential guidelines needed for the transference of your DOS program from XP to Vista.
In order to achieve an efficient and non errant transfer, few precautions must be taken. Both the systems should be properly scanned before performing the operation. The functioning of the desired program should be checked thoroughly before transference. Both the computers should have matching configurations to run the program.

Migrations Using CD or DVD - The migration can also be done by using a CD or DVD. The desired program is copied to a CD or DVD from the source computer and then this copied program is reinstalled to the destination computer equipped with Vista. This method also provides you with the backup option, as the original program remains unaltered with the source computer. The disc which is being used shouldn’t be damaged or corrupt. A proper scanning of both the systems and discs should be done before starting the operation.

Dealing with issues running DOS programs on Vista

Users usually complain about the improper functioning of DOS programs on Vista version. You can pacify your computing needs with the programs of your wish by following some necessary guidelines. To begin with, you can access the maximized DOS window, which is often hard to attain in Windows Vista using the following steps

1. Click on the Start Menu
2. Move up and click on the Run option
3. In the run window, key in “cmd” and press Enter

The DOS window will come up. Find the location of your transferred DOS program and execute the .exe file.

In case you have difficulty in running the DOS program in try using the utility called
DOSBox which effectively facilitates the functioning of the DOS program in Vista.
4:27 PM

System32/drivers/fastfat.sys Is Corrupted Or Is Missing

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Q: My computer shut off one day and I had to restart it. When it came back up it said “System32/drivers/fastfat.sys” is corrupted or is missing so I tried to reinstall but the system shuts down midway through the install. What should I do?

A: The error you are getting, has number of causes attached with it, few noteworthy reasons of this are as follows:

* The fastfat.sys file is really jinxed or missing.
* The error may also arise due to damaged or improperly installed RAM.
* The CD from which you are reinstalling may be damaged or corrupt.
* This error may also linked to NTFS formatting.

Now the probable solutions of the above mentioned causes are described below:

1. Check out whether the RAM is installed properly or not. This can be verified by following the given steps:
* Shut down your computer.
* Gently remove the memory modules leaving enough RAM to start and turn off your system.
* Restart your computer and if you are getting the same error then remove the second memory module from CPU. Continue this process until you find out the corrupt RAM module.
* Once you obtain the damaged RAM, replace it by an efficiently functioning one. If the issue is resolved then stop the further proceedings.
* Note: RAM should be removed with minimum possible force otherwise the memory module could get damaged during removal/insertion. Don’t perform this operation if you are not well versed with required technical knowledge. It is advised to go for an efficient technician to handle this issue
2. If the problem is not resolved by applying the above procedure then please make sure that the CD from which you are reinstalling is correct. Thoroughly clean the CD and reinstall again.
3. If your system is operating with NTFS formatting then you should go for an aligned installation of Windows 2000. This parallel installation will recover the lost fastfat.sys file system.

The above discussion will assist you in solving the given problem. If the issue persists further then get your system checked by highly skilled engineers.
10:09 PM

Issues After Updating Video Card Driver

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Q: According to my System Info, I am running 2 Graphic Display Drivers. An NVIDIA GE Force and SiS 630/730. After I downloaded a driver update for SiS, the HALO game I play seemed slower and jerky. Can I safely uninstall one of these drivers and use the other?

A: If you are running Windows 2000/XP/Vista, you should be able to safely uninstall both of the drivers at the same time. You can do this in the Device Manager. On most systems, you can access the Device Manager by right clicking on the My Computer icon and selecting Properties from the menu. If you are using 2000/XP, you will also need to left click on the Hardware tab. Once in the Device Manager, look for a category with a title like Display adapters. Find the plus sign to the left of the category title and left click. This should show you all of the video cards installed in your system. Use a right click on one of the cards and select the Uninstall option (notice that Disable is also an option here). Repeat for the other card.

You may need to uninstall software related to your video cards using Add/Remove Hardware in the Control Panel. If you haven’t already been forced to restart your computer at this point, do so now. When your system starts again, Windows should automatically detect your video cards. Try your game now. If it works to your satisfaction, you are finished. If not, use the Device Manager to disable the video card not currently connected to your monitor. Try your game again. If it still fails, install drivers from the manufacturers’ websites (go to the computer manufacturer’s website for any card that originally came with your computer). If the game fails yet again, you may need to do an error correction and defragmentation of your hard drives.
10:09 PM

Computer Shuts Off After New Hardware Installed

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Q: I have installed a new motherboard (XFX nforce 681i SLI motherboard. I bought a Seagate 400GHz SATA hard drive to install as my second hard drive. I connect the data transfer cable and the power cable. When I power up the machine, all the lights blink and everything shuts down immediately. A friend has said that there is something wrong in the BIOS. Can someone help me to get this second hard drive installed and working properly? I am running Windows XP if that makes a difference on anything.

A: You probably have a short somewhere in your hardware setup or a bad component. Disconnect and reconnect everything and check for any loose cables or bare wires touching the case. Also, see if the system boots up without that new hard drive installed, as it is possible the hard drive came defective.
10:08 PM

IE 6 Opens On Its Own

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Q: I have been dealing with this problem for a long time. I have IE 6.0, running on Windows XP. I use the IE icon to open my browser. Once it opens everything is great. I have run several malware/adware/virus/worm/trojan protecting software programs everyday. My problem is that new sessions of IE open on their own. But only after I first start the browser. Is there any way to set IE to only open sessions when I ask it, not automatically by some internet source?

A: Hello there! I am sorry to hear that you are having problems with IE 6 opening repeatedly on its own. Even though you run several security applications, I would still bet that the browser is opening on its own because of a virus or malware. Despite your repeated running of an anti-spyware program, the virus or malware is most likely replicating and reinstalling itself on your machine.

It is good to see that you ware running an anti-virus application; the Web is a dangerous place filled with Trojans, malware and spyware just waiting to infect your system. However, running anti-spyware software in itself is not enough; you need to make sure that your program is as updated as often as possible, usually every day, and more often if there is an outbreak of some sort on the Internet. So make sure that you update your anti-virus software.

Next, I would run another anti-spyware program. My favorite is Spybot. It seems to do a very thorough job of cleaning all of the gunk from your system. It has never let me down. Download Spybot from the Web. Download.com is a trusted, secure site for downloading applications like this. Since you are already familiar with running anti-virus software, Spybot should be a piece of cake for you. Simply download the software and follow the directions. You will be amazed at the things that Spybot finds on your computer.

Next, if it has been awhile since you have visited your computer’s security settings, now is a great time to take a look. In your Control Panel, select Internet Options. Here, click the Security tab. Take a gander to see what is going on here. Make sure that your security settings are set above the minimum level; I like to set mine at a Custom level, so that I can configure the settings to allow the traffic to move exactly like I want.

Since you are using Internet Explorer, I would seriously consider moving to another browser. Most spyware or malware, basically all “bad” programs are written for Internet Explorer; programmers tend to leave the other browsers out of the loop because they have fewer users. So by using the most common web browser, you are putting yourself at risk for infection. Download Firefox or Netscape. Trust me, your security risk will dramatically decrease.

I hope this information helps! Good luck!
Q: I have been dealing with this problem for a long time. I have IE 6.0, running on Windows XP. I use the IE icon to open my browser. Once it opens everything is great. I have run several malware/adware/virus/worm/trojan protecting software programs everyday. My problem is that new sessions of IE open on their own. But only after I first start the browser. Is there any way to set IE to only open sessions when I ask it, not automatically by some internet source?

A: Hello there! I am sorry to hear that you are having problems with IE 6 opening repeatedly on its own. Even though you run several security applications, I would still bet that the browser is opening on its own because of a virus or malware. Despite your repeated running of an anti-spyware program, the virus or malware is most likely replicating and reinstalling itself on your machine.

It is good to see that you ware running an anti-virus application; the Web is a dangerous place filled with Trojans, malware and spyware just waiting to infect your system. However, running anti-spyware software in itself is not enough; you need to make sure that your program is as updated as often as possible, usually every day, and more often if there is an outbreak of some sort on the Internet. So make sure that you update your anti-virus software.

Next, I would run another anti-spyware program. My favorite is Spybot. It seems to do a very thorough job of cleaning all of the gunk from your system. It has never let me down. Download Spybot from the Web. Download.com is a trusted, secure site for downloading applications like this. Since you are already familiar with running anti-virus software, Spybot should be a piece of cake for you. Simply download the software and follow the directions. You will be amazed at the things that Spybot finds on your computer.

Next, if it has been awhile since you have visited your computer’s security settings, now is a great time to take a look. In your Control Panel, select Internet Options. Here, click the Security tab. Take a gander to see what is going on here. Make sure that your security settings are set above the minimum level; I like to set mine at a Custom level, so that I can configure the settings to allow the traffic to move exactly like I want.

Since you are using Internet Explorer, I would seriously consider moving to another browser. Most spyware or malware, basically all “bad” programs are written for Internet Explorer; programmers tend to leave the other browsers out of the loop because they have fewer users. So by using the most common web browser, you are putting yourself at risk for infection. Download Firefox or Netscape. Trust me, your security risk will dramatically decrease.

I hope this information helps! Good luck!
Q: I have been dealing with this problem for a long time. I have IE 6.0, running on Windows XP. I use the IE icon to open my browser. Once it opens everything is great. I have run several malware/adware/virus/worm/trojan protecting software programs everyday. My problem is that new sessions of IE open on their own. But only after I first start the browser. Is there any way to set IE to only open sessions when I ask it, not automatically by some internet source?

A: Hello there! I am sorry to hear that you are having problems with IE 6 opening repeatedly on its own. Even though you run several security applications, I would still bet that the browser is opening on its own because of a virus or malware. Despite your repeated running of an anti-spyware program, the virus or malware is most likely replicating and reinstalling itself on your machine.

It is good to see that you ware running an anti-virus application; the Web is a dangerous place filled with Trojans, malware and spyware just waiting to infect your system. However, running anti-spyware software in itself is not enough; you need to make sure that your program is as updated as often as possible, usually every day, and more often if there is an outbreak of some sort on the Internet. So make sure that you update your anti-virus software.

Next, I would run another anti-spyware program. My favorite is Spybot. It seems to do a very thorough job of cleaning all of the gunk from your system. It has never let me down. Download Spybot from the Web. Download.com is a trusted, secure site for downloading applications like this. Since you are already familiar with running anti-virus software, Spybot should be a piece of cake for you. Simply download the software and follow the directions. You will be amazed at the things that Spybot finds on your computer.

Next, if it has been awhile since you have visited your computer’s security settings, now is a great time to take a look. In your Control Panel, select Internet Options. Here, click the Security tab. Take a gander to see what is going on here. Make sure that your security settings are set above the minimum level; I like to set mine at a Custom level, so that I can configure the settings to allow the traffic to move exactly like I want.

Since you are using Internet Explorer, I would seriously consider moving to another browser. Most spyware or malware, basically all “bad” programs are written for Internet Explorer; programmers tend to leave the other browsers out of the loop because they have fewer users. So by using the most common web browser, you are putting yourself at risk for infection. Download Firefox or Netscape. Trust me, your security risk will dramatically decrease.

I hope this information helps! Good luck!
Q: I have been dealing with this problem for a long time. I have IE 6.0, running on Windows XP. I use the IE icon to open my browser. Once it opens everything is great. I have run several malware/adware/virus/worm/trojan protecting software programs everyday. My problem is that new sessions of IE open on their own. But only after I first start the browser. Is there any way to set IE to only open sessions when I ask it, not automatically by some internet source?

A: Hello there! I am sorry to hear that you are having problems with IE 6 opening repeatedly on its own. Even though you run several security applications, I would still bet that the browser is opening on its own because of a virus or malware. Despite your repeated running of an anti-spyware program, the virus or malware is most likely replicating and reinstalling itself on your machine.

It is good to see that you ware running an anti-virus application; the Web is a dangerous place filled with Trojans, malware and spyware just waiting to infect your system. However, running anti-spyware software in itself is not enough; you need to make sure that your program is as updated as often as possible, usually every day, and more often if there is an outbreak of some sort on the Internet. So make sure that you update your anti-virus software.

Next, I would run another anti-spyware program. My favorite is Spybot. It seems to do a very thorough job of cleaning all of the gunk from your system. It has never let me down. Download Spybot from the Web. Download.com is a trusted, secure site for downloading applications like this. Since you are already familiar with running anti-virus software, Spybot should be a piece of cake for you. Simply download the software and follow the directions. You will be amazed at the things that Spybot finds on your computer.

Next, if it has been awhile since you have visited your computer’s security settings, now is a great time to take a look. In your Control Panel, select Internet Options. Here, click the Security tab. Take a gander to see what is going on here. Make sure that your security settings are set above the minimum level; I like to set mine at a Custom level, so that I can configure the settings to allow the traffic to move exactly like I want.

Since you are using Internet Explorer, I would seriously consider moving to another browser. Most spyware or malware, basically all “bad” programs are written for Internet Explorer; programmers tend to leave the other browsers out of the loop because they have fewer users. So by using the most common web browser, you are putting yourself at risk for infection. Download Firefox or Netscape. Trust me, your security risk will dramatically decrease.

I hope this information helps! Good luck!
Q: I have been dealing with this problem for a long time. I have IE 6.0, running on Windows XP. I use the IE icon to open my browser. Once it opens everything is great. I have run several malware/adware/virus/worm/trojan protecting software programs everyday. My problem is that new sessions of IE open on their own. But only after I first start the browser. Is there any way to set IE to only open sessions when I ask it, not automatically by some internet source?

A: Hello there! I am sorry to hear that you are having problems with IE 6 opening repeatedly on its own. Even though you run several security applications, I would still bet that the browser is opening on its own because of a virus or malware. Despite your repeated running of an anti-spyware program, the virus or malware is most likely replicating and reinstalling itself on your machine.

It is good to see that you ware running an anti-virus application; the Web is a dangerous place filled with Trojans, malware and spyware just waiting to infect your system. However, running anti-spyware software in itself is not enough; you need to make sure that your program is as updated as often as possible, usually every day, and more often if there is an outbreak of some sort on the Internet. So make sure that you update your anti-virus software.

Next, I would run another anti-spyware program. My favorite is Spybot. It seems to do a very thorough job of cleaning all of the gunk from your system. It has never let me down. Download Spybot from the Web. Download.com is a trusted, secure site for downloading applications like this. Since you are already familiar with running anti-virus software, Spybot should be a piece of cake for you. Simply download the software and follow the directions. You will be amazed at the things that Spybot finds on your computer.

Next, if it has been awhile since you have visited your computer’s security settings, now is a great time to take a look. In your Control Panel, select Internet Options. Here, click the Security tab. Take a gander to see what is going on here. Make sure that your security settings are set above the minimum level; I like to set mine at a Custom level, so that I can configure the settings to allow the traffic to move exactly like I want.

Since you are using Internet Explorer, I would seriously consider moving to another browser. Most spyware or malware, basically all “bad” programs are written for Internet Explorer; programmers tend to leave the other browsers out of the loop because they have fewer users. So by using the most common web browser, you are putting yourself at risk for infection. Download Firefox or Netscape. Trust me, your security risk will dramatically decrease.

I hope this information helps! Good luck!
Q: I have been dealing with this problem for a long time. I have IE 6.0, running on Windows XP. I use the IE icon to open my browser. Once it opens everything is great. I have run several malware/adware/virus/worm/trojan protecting software programs everyday. My problem is that new sessions of IE open on their own. But only after I first start the browser. Is there any way to set IE to only open sessions when I ask it, not automatically by some internet source?

A: Hello there! I am sorry to hear that you are having problems with IE 6 opening repeatedly on its own. Even though you run several security applications, I would still bet that the browser is opening on its own because of a virus or malware. Despite your repeated running of an anti-spyware program, the virus or malware is most likely replicating and reinstalling itself on your machine.

It is good to see that you ware running an anti-virus application; the Web is a dangerous place filled with Trojans, malware and spyware just waiting to infect your system. However, running anti-spyware software in itself is not enough; you need to make sure that your program is as updated as often as possible, usually every day, and more often if there is an outbreak of some sort on the Internet. So make sure that you update your anti-virus software.

Next, I would run another anti-spyware program. My favorite is Spybot. It seems to do a very thorough job of cleaning all of the gunk from your system. It has never let me down. Download Spybot from the Web. Download.com is a trusted, secure site for downloading applications like this. Since you are already familiar with running anti-virus software, Spybot should be a piece of cake for you. Simply download the software and follow the directions. You will be amazed at the things that Spybot finds on your computer.

Next, if it has been awhile since you have visited your computer’s security settings, now is a great time to take a look. In your Control Panel, select Internet Options. Here, click the Security tab. Take a gander to see what is going on here. Make sure that your security settings are set above the minimum level; I like to set mine at a Custom level, so that I can configure the settings to allow the traffic to move exactly like I want.

Since you are using Internet Explorer, I would seriously consider moving to another browser. Most spyware or malware, basically all “bad” programs are written for Internet Explorer; programmers tend to leave the other browsers out of the loop because they have fewer users. So by using the most common web browser, you are putting yourself at risk for infection. Download Firefox or Netscape. Trust me, your security risk will dramatically decrease.

I hope this information helps! Good luck!
Q: I have been dealing with this problem for a long time. I have IE 6.0, running on Windows XP. I use the IE icon to open my browser. Once it opens everything is great. I have run several malware/adware/virus/worm/trojan protecting software programs everyday. My problem is that new sessions of IE open on their own. But only after I first start the browser. Is there any way to set IE to only open sessions when I ask it, not automatically by some internet source?

A: Hello there! I am sorry to hear that you are having problems with IE 6 opening repeatedly on its own. Even though you run several security applications, I would still bet that the browser is opening on its own because of a virus or malware. Despite your repeated running of an anti-spyware program, the virus or malware is most likely replicating and reinstalling itself on your machine.

It is good to see that you ware running an anti-virus application; the Web is a dangerous place filled with Trojans, malware and spyware just waiting to infect your system. However, running anti-spyware software in itself is not enough; you need to make sure that your program is as updated as often as possible, usually every day, and more often if there is an outbreak of some sort on the Internet. So make sure that you update your anti-virus software.

Next, I would run another anti-spyware program. My favorite is Spybot. It seems to do a very thorough job of cleaning all of the gunk from your system. It has never let me down. Download Spybot from the Web. Download.com is a trusted, secure site for downloading applications like this. Since you are already familiar with running anti-virus software, Spybot should be a piece of cake for you. Simply download the software and follow the directions. You will be amazed at the things that Spybot finds on your computer.

Next, if it has been awhile since you have visited your computer’s security settings, now is a great time to take a look. In your Control Panel, select Internet Options. Here, click the Security tab. Take a gander to see what is going on here. Make sure that your security settings are set above the minimum level; I like to set mine at a Custom level, so that I can configure the settings to allow the traffic to move exactly like I want.

Since you are using Internet Explorer, I would seriously consider moving to another browser. Most spyware or malware, basically all “bad” programs are written for Internet Explorer; programmers tend to leave the other browsers out of the loop because they have fewer users. So by using the most common web browser, you are putting yourself at risk for infection. Download Firefox or Netscape. Trust me, your security risk will dramatically decrease.

I hope this information helps! Good luck!
Q: I have been dealing with this problem for a long time. I have IE 6.0, running on Windows XP. I use the IE icon to open my browser. Once it opens everything is great. I have run several malware/adware/virus/worm/trojan protecting software programs everyday. My problem is that new sessions of IE open on their own. But only after I first start the browser. Is there any way to set IE to only open sessions when I ask it, not automatically by some internet source?

A: Hello there! I am sorry to hear that you are having problems with IE 6 opening repeatedly on its own. Even though you run several security applications, I would still bet that the browser is opening on its own because of a virus or malware. Despite your repeated running of an anti-spyware program, the virus or malware is most likely replicating and reinstalling itself on your machine.

It is good to see that you ware running an anti-virus application; the Web is a dangerous place filled with Trojans, malware and spyware just waiting to infect your system. However, running anti-spyware software in itself is not enough; you need to make sure that your program is as updated as often as possible, usually every day, and more often if there is an outbreak of some sort on the Internet. So make sure that you update your anti-virus software.

Next, I would run another anti-spyware program. My favorite is Spybot. It seems to do a very thorough job of cleaning all of the gunk from your system. It has never let me down. Download Spybot from the Web. Download.com is a trusted, secure site for downloading applications like this. Since you are already familiar with running anti-virus software, Spybot should be a piece of cake for you. Simply download the software and follow the directions. You will be amazed at the things that Spybot finds on your computer.

Next, if it has been awhile since you have visited your computer’s security settings, now is a great time to take a look. In your Control Panel, select Internet Options. Here, click the Security tab. Take a gander to see what is going on here. Make sure that your security settings are set above the minimum level; I like to set mine at a Custom level, so that I can configure the settings to allow the traffic to move exactly like I want.

Since you are using Internet Explorer, I would seriously consider moving to another browser. Most spyware or malware, basically all “bad” programs are written for Internet Explorer; programmers tend to leave the other browsers out of the loop because they have fewer users. So by using the most common web browser, you are putting yourself at risk for infection. Download Firefox or Netscape. Trust me, your security risk will dramatically decrease.

I hope this information helps! Good luck!
Q: I have been dealing with this problem for a long time. I have IE 6.0, running on Windows XP. I use the IE icon to open my browser. Once it opens everything is great. I have run several malware/adware/virus/worm/trojan protecting software programs everyday. My problem is that new sessions of IE open on their own. But only after I first start the browser. Is there any way to set IE to only open sessions when I ask it, not automatically by some internet source?

A: Hello there! I am sorry to hear that you are having problems with IE 6 opening repeatedly on its own. Even though you run several security applications, I would still bet that the browser is opening on its own because of a virus or malware. Despite your repeated running of an anti-spyware program, the virus or malware is most likely replicating and reinstalling itself on your machine.

It is good to see that you ware running an anti-virus application; the Web is a dangerous place filled with Trojans, malware and spyware just waiting to infect your system. However, running anti-spyware software in itself is not enough; you need to make sure that your program is as updated as often as possible, usually every day, and more often if there is an outbreak of some sort on the Internet. So make sure that you update your anti-virus software.

Next, I would run another anti-spyware program. My favorite is Spybot. It seems to do a very thorough job of cleaning all of the gunk from your system. It has never let me down. Download Spybot from the Web. Download.com is a trusted, secure site for downloading applications like this. Since you are already familiar with running anti-virus software, Spybot should be a piece of cake for you. Simply download the software and follow the directions. You will be amazed at the things that Spybot finds on your computer.

Next, if it has been awhile since you have visited your computer’s security settings, now is a great time to take a look. In your Control Panel, select Internet Options. Here, click the Security tab. Take a gander to see what is going on here. Make sure that your security settings are set above the minimum level; I like to set mine at a Custom level, so that I can configure the settings to allow the traffic to move exactly like I want.

Since you are using Internet Explorer, I would seriously consider moving to another browser. Most spyware or malware, basically all “bad” programs are written for Internet Explorer; programmers tend to leave the other browsers out of the loop because they have fewer users. So by using the most common web browser, you are putting yourself at risk for infection. Download Firefox or Netscape. Trust me, your security risk will dramatically decrease.

I hope this information helps! Good luck!
Q: I have been dealing with this problem for a long time. I have IE 6.0, running on Windows XP. I use the IE icon to open my browser. Once it opens everything is great. I have run several malware/adware/virus/worm/trojan protecting software programs everyday. My problem is that new sessions of IE open on their own. But only after I first start the browser. Is there any way to set IE to only open sessions when I ask it, not automatically by some internet source?

A: Hello there! I am sorry to hear that you are having problems with IE 6 opening repeatedly on its own. Even though you run several security applications, I would still bet that the browser is opening on its own because of a virus or malware. Despite your repeated running of an anti-spyware program, the virus or malware is most likely replicating and reinstalling itself on your machine.

It is good to see that you ware running an anti-virus application; the Web is a dangerous place filled with Trojans, malware and spyware just waiting to infect your system. However, running anti-spyware software in itself is not enough; you need to make sure that your program is as updated as often as possible, usually every day, and more often if there is an outbreak of some sort on the Internet. So make sure that you update your anti-virus software.

Next, I would run another anti-spyware program. My favorite is Spybot. It seems to do a very thorough job of cleaning all of the gunk from your system. It has never let me down. Download Spybot from the Web. Download.com is a trusted, secure site for downloading applications like this. Since you are already familiar with running anti-virus software, Spybot should be a piece of cake for you. Simply download the software and follow the directions. You will be amazed at the things that Spybot finds on your computer.

Next, if it has been awhile since you have visited your computer’s security settings, now is a great time to take a look. In your Control Panel, select Internet Options. Here, click the Security tab. Take a gander to see what is going on here. Make sure that your security settings are set above the minimum level; I like to set mine at a Custom level, so that I can configure the settings to allow the traffic to move exactly like I want.

Since you are using Internet Explorer, I would seriously consider moving to another browser. Most spyware or malware, basically all “bad” programs are written for Internet Explorer; programmers tend to leave the other browsers out of the loop because they have fewer users. So by using the most common web browser, you are putting yourself at risk for infection. Download Firefox or Netscape. Trust me, your security risk will dramatically decrease.

I hope this information helps! Good luck!
Q: I have been dealing with this problem for a long time. I have IE 6.0, running on Windows XP. I use the IE icon to open my browser. Once it opens everything is great. I have run several malware/adware/virus/worm/trojan protecting software programs everyday. My problem is that new sessions of IE open on their own. But only after I first start the browser. Is there any way to set IE to only open sessions when I ask it, not automatically by some internet source?

A: Hello there! I am sorry to hear that you are having problems with IE 6 opening repeatedly on its own. Even though you run several security applications, I would still bet that the browser is opening on its own because of a virus or malware. Despite your repeated running of an anti-spyware program, the virus or malware is most likely replicating and reinstalling itself on your machine.

It is good to see that you ware running an anti-virus application; the Web is a dangerous place filled with Trojans, malware and spyware just waiting to infect your system. However, running anti-spyware software in itself is not enough; you need to make sure that your program is as updated as often as possible, usually every day, and more often if there is an outbreak of some sort on the Internet. So make sure that you update your anti-virus software.

Next, I would run another anti-spyware program. My favorite is Spybot. It seems to do a very thorough job of cleaning all of the gunk from your system. It has never let me down. Download Spybot from the Web. Download.com is a trusted, secure site for downloading applications like this. Since you are already familiar with running anti-virus software, Spybot should be a piece of cake for you. Simply download the software and follow the directions. You will be amazed at the things that Spybot finds on your computer.

Next, if it has been awhile since you have visited your computer’s security settings, now is a great time to take a look. In your Control Panel, select Internet Options. Here, click the Security tab. Take a gander to see what is going on here. Make sure that your security settings are set above the minimum level; I like to set mine at a Custom level, so that I can configure the settings to allow the traffic to move exactly like I want.

Since you are using Internet Explorer, I would seriously consider moving to another browser. Most spyware or malware, basically all “bad” programs are written for Internet Explorer; programmers tend to leave the other browsers out of the loop because they have fewer users. So by using the most common web browser, you are putting yourself at risk for infection. Download Firefox or Netscape. Trust me, your security risk will dramatically decrease.

I hope this information helps! Good luck!
Q: I have been dealing with this problem for a long time. I have IE 6.0, running on Windows XP. I use the IE icon to open my browser. Once it opens everything is great. I have run several malware/adware/virus/worm/trojan protecting software programs everyday. My problem is that new sessions of IE open on their own. But only after I first start the browser. Is there any way to set IE to only open sessions when I ask it, not automatically by some internet source?

A: Hello there! I am sorry to hear that you are having problems with IE 6 opening repeatedly on its own. Even though you run several security applications, I would still bet that the browser is opening on its own because of a virus or malware. Despite your repeated running of an anti-spyware program, the virus or malware is most likely replicating and reinstalling itself on your machine.

It is good to see that you ware running an anti-virus application; the Web is a dangerous place filled with Trojans, malware and spyware just waiting to infect your system. However, running anti-spyware software in itself is not enough; you need to make sure that your program is as updated as often as possible, usually every day, and more often if there is an outbreak of some sort on the Internet. So make sure that you update your anti-virus software.

Next, I would run another anti-spyware program. My favorite is Spybot. It seems to do a very thorough job of cleaning all of the gunk from your system. It has never let me down. Download Spybot from the Web. Download.com is a trusted, secure site for downloading applications like this. Since you are already familiar with running anti-virus software, Spybot should be a piece of cake for you. Simply download the software and follow the directions. You will be amazed at the things that Spybot finds on your computer.

Next, if it has been awhile since you have visited your computer’s security settings, now is a great time to take a look. In your Control Panel, select Internet Options. Here, click the Security tab. Take a gander to see what is going on here. Make sure that your security settings are set above the minimum level; I like to set mine at a Custom level, so that I can configure the settings to allow the traffic to move exactly like I want.

Since you are using Internet Explorer, I would seriously consider moving to another browser. Most spyware or malware, basically all “bad” programs are written for Internet Explorer; programmers tend to leave the other browsers out of the loop because they have fewer users. So by using the most common web browser, you are putting yourself at risk for infection. Download Firefox or Netscape. Trust me, your security risk will dramatically decrease.

I hope this information helps! Good luck!
Q: I have been dealing with this problem for a long time. I have IE 6.0, running on Windows XP. I use the IE icon to open my browser. Once it opens everything is great. I have run several malware/adware/virus/worm/trojan protecting software programs everyday. My problem is that new sessions of IE open on their own. But only after I first start the browser. Is there any way to set IE to only open sessions when I ask it, not automatically by some internet source?

A: Hello there! I am sorry to hear that you are having problems with IE 6 opening repeatedly on its own. Even though you run several security applications, I would still bet that the browser is opening on its own because of a virus or malware. Despite your repeated running of an anti-spyware program, the virus or malware is most likely replicating and reinstalling itself on your machine.

It is good to see that you ware running an anti-virus application; the Web is a dangerous place filled with Trojans, malware and spyware just waiting to infect your system. However, running anti-spyware software in itself is not enough; you need to make sure that your program is as updated as often as possible, usually every day, and more often if there is an outbreak of some sort on the Internet. So make sure that you update your anti-virus software.

Next, I would run another anti-spyware program. My favorite is Spybot. It seems to do a very thorough job of cleaning all of the gunk from your system. It has never let me down. Download Spybot from the Web. Download.com is a trusted, secure site for downloading applications like this. Since you are already familiar with running anti-virus software, Spybot should be a piece of cake for you. Simply download the software and follow the directions. You will be amazed at the things that Spybot finds on your computer.

Next, if it has been awhile since you have visited your computer’s security settings, now is a great time to take a look. In your Control Panel, select Internet Options. Here, click the Security tab. Take a gander to see what is going on here. Make sure that your security settings are set above the minimum level; I like to set mine at a Custom level, so that I can configure the settings to allow the traffic to move exactly like I want.

Since you are using Internet Explorer, I would seriously consider moving to another browser. Most spyware or malware, basically all “bad” programs are written for Internet Explorer; programmers tend to leave the other browsers out of the loop because they have fewer users. So by using the most common web browser, you are putting yourself at risk for infection. Download Firefox or Netscape. Trust me, your security risk will dramatically decrease.

I hope this information helps! Good luck!
Q: I have been dealing with this problem for a long time. I have IE 6.0, running on Windows XP. I use the IE icon to open my browser. Once it opens everything is great. I have run several malware/adware/virus/worm/trojan protecting software programs everyday. My problem is that new sessions of IE open on their own. But only after I first start the browser. Is there any way to set IE to only open sessions when I ask it, not automatically by some internet source?

A: Hello there! I am sorry to hear that you are having problems with IE 6 opening repeatedly on its own. Even though you run several security applications, I would still bet that the browser is opening on its own because of a virus or malware. Despite your repeated running of an anti-spyware program, the virus or malware is most likely replicating and reinstalling itself on your machine.

It is good to see that you ware running an anti-virus application; the Web is a dangerous place filled with Trojans, malware and spyware just waiting to infect your system. However, running anti-spyware software in itself is not enough; you need to make sure that your program is as updated as often as possible, usually every day, and more often if there is an outbreak of some sort on the Internet. So make sure that you update your anti-virus software.

Next, I would run another anti-spyware program. My favorite is Spybot. It seems to do a very thorough job of cleaning all of the gunk from your system. It has never let me down. Download Spybot from the Web. Download.com is a trusted, secure site for downloading applications like this. Since you are already familiar with running anti-virus software, Spybot should be a piece of cake for you. Simply download the software and follow the directions. You will be amazed at the things that Spybot finds on your computer.

Next, if it has been awhile since you have visited your computer’s security settings, now is a great time to take a look. In your Control Panel, select Internet Options. Here, click the Security tab. Take a gander to see what is going on here. Make sure that your security settings are set above the minimum level; I like to set mine at a Custom level, so that I can configure the settings to allow the traffic to move exactly like I want.

Since you are using Internet Explorer, I would seriously consider moving to another browser. Most spyware or malware, basically all “bad” programs are written for Internet Explorer; programmers tend to leave the other browsers out of the loop because they have fewer users. So by using the most common web browser, you are putting yourself at risk for infection. Download Firefox or Netscape. Trust me, your security risk will dramatically decrease.

I hope this information helps! Good luck!
Q: I have been dealing with this problem for a long time. I have IE 6.0, running on Windows XP. I use the IE icon to open my browser. Once it opens everything is great. I have run several malware/adware/virus/worm/trojan protecting software programs everyday. My problem is that new sessions of IE open on their own. But only after I first start the browser. Is there any way to set IE to only open sessions when I ask it, not automatically by some internet source?

A: Hello there! I am sorry to hear that you are having problems with IE 6 opening repeatedly on its own. Even though you run several security applications, I would still bet that the browser is opening on its own because of a virus or malware. Despite your repeated running of an anti-spyware program, the virus or malware is most likely replicating and reinstalling itself on your machine.

It is good to see that you ware running an anti-virus application; the Web is a dangerous place filled with Trojans, malware and spyware just waiting to infect your system. However, running anti-spyware software in itself is not enough; you need to make sure that your program is as updated as often as possible, usually every day, and more often if there is an outbreak of some sort on the Internet. So make sure that you update your anti-virus software.

Next, I would run another anti-spyware program. My favorite is Spybot. It seems to do a very thorough job of cleaning all of the gunk from your system. It has never let me down. Download Spybot from the Web. Download.com is a trusted, secure site for downloading applications like this. Since you are already familiar with running anti-virus software, Spybot should be a piece of cake for you. Simply download the software and follow the directions. You will be amazed at the things that Spybot finds on your computer.

Next, if it has been awhile since you have visited your computer’s security settings, now is a great time to take a look. In your Control Panel, select Internet Options. Here, click the Security tab. Take a gander to see what is going on here. Make sure that your security settings are set above the minimum level; I like to set mine at a Custom level, so that I can configure the settings to allow the traffic to move exactly like I want.

Since you are using Internet Explorer, I would seriously consider moving to another browser. Most spyware or malware, basically all “bad” programs are written for Internet Explorer; programmers tend to leave the other browsers out of the loop because they have fewer users. So by using the most common web browser, you are putting yourself at risk for infection. Download Firefox or Netscape. Trust me, your security risk will dramatically decrease.

I hope this information helps! Good luck!
Q: I have been dealing with this problem for a long time. I have IE 6.0, running on Windows XP. I use the IE icon to open my browser. Once it opens everything is great. I have run several malware/adware/virus/worm/trojan protecting software programs everyday. My problem is that new sessions of IE open on their own. But only after I first start the browser. Is there any way to set IE to only open sessions when I ask it, not automatically by some internet source?

A: Hello there! I am sorry to hear that you are having problems with IE 6 opening repeatedly on its own. Even though you run several security applications, I would still bet that the browser is opening on its own because of a virus or malware. Despite your repeated running of an anti-spyware program, the virus or malware is most likely replicating and reinstalling itself on your machine.

It is good to see that you ware running an anti-virus application; the Web is a dangerous place filled with Trojans, malware and spyware just waiting to infect your system. However, running anti-spyware software in itself is not enough; you need to make sure that your program is as updated as often as possible, usually every day, and more often if there is an outbreak of some sort on the Internet. So make sure that you update your anti-virus software.

Next, I would run another anti-spyware program. My favorite is Spybot. It seems to do a very thorough job of cleaning all of the gunk from your system. It has never let me down. Download Spybot from the Web. Download.com is a trusted, secure site for downloading applications like this. Since you are already familiar with running anti-virus software, Spybot should be a piece of cake for you. Simply download the software and follow the directions. You will be amazed at the things that Spybot finds on your computer.

Next, if it has been awhile since you have visited your computer’s security settings, now is a great time to take a look. In your Control Panel, select Internet Options. Here, click the Security tab. Take a gander to see what is going on here. Make sure that your security settings are set above the minimum level; I like to set mine at a Custom level, so that I can configure the settings to allow the traffic to move exactly like I want.

Since you are using Internet Explorer, I would seriously consider moving to another browser. Most spyware or malware, basically all “bad” programs are written for Internet Explorer; programmers tend to leave the other browsers out of the loop because they have fewer users. So by using the most common web browser, you are putting yourself at risk for infection. Download Firefox or Netscape. Trust me, your security risk will dramatically decrease.

I hope this information helps! Good luck!
Q: I have been dealing with this problem for a long time. I have IE 6.0, running on Windows XP. I use the IE icon to open my browser. Once it opens everything is great. I have run several malware/adware/virus/worm/trojan protecting software programs everyday. My problem is that new sessions of IE open on their own. But only after I first start the browser. Is there any way to set IE to only open sessions when I ask it, not automatically by some internet source?

A: Hello there! I am sorry to hear that you are having problems with IE 6 opening repeatedly on its own. Even though you run several security applications, I would still bet that the browser is opening on its own because of a virus or malware. Despite your repeated running of an anti-spyware program, the virus or malware is most likely replicating and reinstalling itself on your machine.

It is good to see that you ware running an anti-virus application; the Web is a dangerous place filled with Trojans, malware and spyware just waiting to infect your system. However, running anti-spyware software in itself is not enough; you need to make sure that your program is as updated as often as possible, usually every day, and more often if there is an outbreak of some sort on the Internet. So make sure that you update your anti-virus software.

Next, I would run another anti-spyware program. My favorite is Spybot. It seems to do a very thorough job of cleaning all of the gunk from your system. It has never let me down. Download Spybot from the Web. Download.com is a trusted, secure site for downloading applications like this. Since you are already familiar with running anti-virus software, Spybot should be a piece of cake for you. Simply download the software and follow the directions. You will be amazed at the things that Spybot finds on your computer.

Next, if it has been awhile since you have visited your computer’s security settings, now is a great time to take a look. In your Control Panel, select Internet Options. Here, click the Security tab. Take a gander to see what is going on here. Make sure that your security settings are set above the minimum level; I like to set mine at a Custom level, so that I can configure the settings to allow the traffic to move exactly like I want.

Since you are using Internet Explorer, I would seriously consider moving to another browser. Most spyware or malware, basically all “bad” programs are written for Internet Explorer; programmers tend to leave the other browsers out of the loop because they have fewer users. So by using the most common web browser, you are putting yourself at risk for infection. Download Firefox or Netscape. Trust me, your security risk will dramatically decrease.

I hope this information helps! Good luck!
10:07 PM

Which SATA Hard Drive is Faster?

0 Comments »
Q: Which is faster, 400GB 4200RPM SATA Dual Hard Drive or 200 GB 7200RPM SATA Dual Hard Drive?

A: There are a few factors that affect the speed of a hard drive; the size of the hard drive, how the drive is partitioned, the number of Rotations Per Minute (RPM), the seek time of the hard drive, and the data throughput of the device. Serial ATA (SATA) II drives are much faster than their predecessors with a data throughput of 3.0Gbit/s, compared to the 1.5Gbit/s speeds of the first generation SATA drives.

If the two SATA drives you describe are second generation drives, what ultimately determines their performance will be size, RPM, seek time, partitioning scheme, and the speed of the machine they are installed on. The 4200RPM drive is most likely going to have a longer seek time than the 7200RPM drive and therefore it will be noticeably slower. The slower RPM and seek time will become more noticeable on the 400GB drive due to the size of the drive. Creating multiple partitions on a drive that large will help to improve the overall performance of the drive. Finally, these drives will perform best on systems with native SATA support as opposed to systems with SATA add-on cards.

Additionally, when manufacturers refer to Dual Drives, they are simply pairing two drives of a smaller size together and spanning them to create one drive on the system. Even though your PC may only recognize them as one drive, there are actually two physical drives (2x 200GB) in the system. In some cases it may be more cost effective to purchase one larger drive than purchasing Dual Drives for your system.
10:07 PM

Changing Font Size in Web Browsers

0 Comments »
Q: The font on web pages has changed and now some of them are so small that I cannot read them. I do not remember doing anything different or changing anything, please help!

A: Sometimes the sizes of display fonts in your web browser are changed accidentally by a combination of keystrokes. There are two ways to change the size of fonts in Internet Explorer. If you click on Page > Text Size then you can choose the size you are most comfortable using. Medium is the default font size setting. You can also change the font size by holding down the Control key and clicking + or - to increase or decrease size respectfully.

If you use Firefox, you can change the font size by clicking on View > Text Size and choose Increase or Decrease. Like in Internet Explorer, you can also change the font size by holding down the Control key and clicking + or -.
10:06 PM

Change Your Resolution On Windows XP

0 Comments »
Q: I have a Dell Inspiron 8600 laptop running Windows XP and I am having a problem where the screen is wide and has enlarged everything. How do we resize the screen?

A: I am assuming that you are wanting to adjust the screen resolution because the icons and wording on the desktop are large. In order to do this you will need to perform the following steps:

1. Right click on an empty area on your desktop and select Properties.

2. Select the Settings tab.

3. In the bottom left corner you will see the screen resolution slider bar. To make your desktop icons and screen smaller you want to move the screen resolution bar to the right.

4. When you have selected your preferred size click Apply and Ok.

5. You will be prompted to make sure that you want to resize and click Yes.
10:04 PM

Desktop Icons Randomly Appear And Disappear

0 Comments »
Q: I have Windows XP SP2 loaded on my PC and my computer is updated regularly using Microsoft Update. Recently my desktop icons have started disappearing and appearing for no apparent reason. I have defragged and error checked my computers hard drive but that did nothing. I also have an anti-virus program from AVG installed so I am fairly certain my computer is virus free. I have also checked for Trojans using spybot and nothing has shown up. My computer runs great besides the icons randomly appearing and disappearing.

A: I know that you have tried both anti-virus and spybot so I have some instructions to see if this will alleviate the problem for you. If it does not please let me know. This does require editing an entry in your registry so I strongly recommend that you backup your registry before you begin.

1. Ctrl + Alt + Delete and identify sysu.exe in the processes list.
2. Close it, and go to C:\Program Files.
3. Locate the folder ddm and delete it.
4. Click on start -> run and type in regedit.
5. Under HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE -> SOFTWARE remove the folder ddm.
6. Click on start -> run and type in msconfig.
7. Click on the right-most tab labeled startup.
8. Scroll down and locate an entry with no command line.
9. Uncheck the box and apply all changes.
10. Reboot your computer; check the checkbox for a window that comes up saying you changed startup settings.
10:04 PM

Desktop Icons And Taskbar Disappear

0 Comments »
Q: I have a computer with Windows XP Pro SP2 and when I turned on my computer the desktop icons and taskbar came up as usual. However, after about 30 seconds the desktop items and the taskbar disappear. They came back after a couple of seconds and then went away again. This continued for a few minutes until the desktop icons and the taskbar were just gone for good. I have done heaps of virus scans with Kaspersky and spyware scans with Spybot but nothing has worked. Can you help me?

A: The problems that you have mentioned all relate to a program within Windows called explorer.exe. Do not worry, explorer.exe is supposed to be part of Windows. It manages many different parts of the user interface in Windows. As long as your antivirus and anti-spyware programs are up-to-date, you can probably believe the results of your security scans. Most often, explorer.exe fails because Windows cannot find where it is physically located on your hard drive. There are some maintenance routines built into Windows XP that should help Windows to find the location of explore.exe and other files too.

The first of these is called defragmentation. This tool helps your computer to make a map of the files on its hard drive so that Windows can find them more easily. You can access this feature by going: My Computer => right click on your hard drive => Properties => Tools. The second maintenance feature, Error-checking, is also located in the Tools tab. Please select both checkboxes in the Error-checking window. The next time you restart your computer, your hard drive will be scanned for errors and repaired. Repeat these routines for all of the hard drives in your computer. For you future reference, neither Linux nor Mac computers currently require the use of such maintenance programs.

I am 99.9% sure that the tools described above will fix your problem. If not, consider creating backups of your important data and reinstalling Windows. Good Luck!



After you log on to your computer and your icons/taskbar disappear do Ctr + Alt + Del and then click File -> New Task and when prompted type in regedit.exe. A new window will open up and you will need to go to the folder that says HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE -> Software -> Microsoft -> Windows NT -> Current Version -> just click on winlogon once, do not expand it.

Then you will need to locate Shell on the right hand side. Right click on Shell and change its value to explorer.exe if it isn’t already. Mine was already explorer.exe but I retyped it and entered it and it works now.
10:02 PM

Descriptive programming for Google search page

0 Comments »
Descriptive programming for Google search page

SystemUtil.run "iexplore.exe","http://www.google.com"
Browser("name:=Google.*").Page("title:=Google.*").WebEdit("name:=q")
.set"Testing"
Browser("name:=Google.*").Page("title:=Google.*").
WebButton("name:=Google Search").Click
5:12 PM

Gtalk smilies

0 Comments »
[skull]
[bug]
[alien]
[frustu]
[pray]
[moneye]
[whistle]
[beatup]
[victory]
[shame]
[dance]
[comeon]
[hehe]
[chatterbox]
[noworthy]
[star]
[funny]
[love1]
[love2]
[love3]
[love4]
[love5]
[love6]
[love7]
[ilu]
[holiday]
[arghh]
[whack]
[master]
[virus]
[agent]
[ip]
10:13 PM

multiple login in Gtalk

0 Comments »
in the properties of ur Gtalk icon..
change its target to


"c:\Program Files\Google\Google Talk\googletalk.exe" /nomutex



and you can now log into g talk with multiple accounts
10:07 PM

speed up your net

0 Comments »
make a registry file {anything.reg}



REGEDIT4

[HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\System\CurrentControlSet\Services\Class\NetTrans\0000]
"MaxMTU"="576"
"MaxMSS"="536"



and click it..u'll observe speed increment in your intrernet
10:05 PM

To Enable Registry Editing

0 Comments »
Click Start, Run and type GPEDIT.MSC to launch the Group Policy Editor, Now goto User Configuration \ Administrative Templates \ System and set the policy (Prevent access to registry editiing tool) to Not Configured
10:04 PM

To enable Folder options

0 Comments »
Go to Run –>gpedit.msc
User Configuration –> Administrative Templates –> Windows Components –> Windows Explorer
Enable and then Disable “Removes Folder Options menu from Tools menu“
10:04 PM

Enable Task Manager

0 Comments »
Click Start then Run.
Enter gpedit.msc at the command line and click OK. This will open the Group Policy settings window
Select User Configuration | Administrative Templates | System | Ctrl+Alt+Delete Options | Remove Task Manager.
Double-click the Remove Task Manager option from the Group Policy menu. You can then disable, enable, or set the policy to Not Configured. Remember: Since the policy in question is called Remove Task Manager, by disabling the policy, you are actually enabling the Task Manager.
10:03 PM

ORKUT IS BANNED

0 Comments »
I DONT HATE MOZILLA! ORKUT IS BANNED!!


1. Press CTRL+ALT+DEL and go to the processes tab
2. Look for svchost.exe under the image name. There will be many but look for the ones which have your username under the username
3. Press DEL to kill these files. It will give you a warning, Press Yes
4. Repeat for more svchost.exe files with your username and repeat. Do not kill svchost.exe with system, local service or network service!
5. Now open My Computer
6. In the address bar, type C:\heap41a and press enter. It is a hidden folder, and is not visible by default.
7. Delete all the files here
8. Now go to Start --> Run and type Regedit
9. Go to the menu Edit --> Find
10. Type "heap41a" here and press enter. You will get something like this "[winlogon] C:\heap41a\svchost.exe C:\heap(some number)\std.txt"
11. Select that and Press DEL. It will ask "Are you sure you wanna delete this value", click Yes
12. Now close the registry editor.
10:03 PM